“The psychological impact of pulmonary embolism: A mixed‐methods study”

We are extremely grateful to have been given the opportunity to share the following research paper.

“The psychological impact of pulmonary embolism: A mixed‐methods study”

(Anna Tran BSc, Marcus Redley PhD and Kerstin de Wit MBChB, MD, MSc)

An insight into surviving a deadly blood clot.

On the 12th April 2011 I fell to the floor in the en-suite at home. My last words were. (rather ironically as it turns out); “I don’t feel too well….!!”

Surviving, taking the medications, attending clinical appointments, building health and strength back, these are the easier things to do. The psychological effect of surviving is, however, a much darker, tough journey fraught with pain.

PTSD

Depression

Survivors Guilt

Suicidal Thoughts

Failure

These are just some of the demons that fill your head as you go through each new day.

With this in mind, we are extremely grateful to have been given the opportunity to share the following research paper.

The paper looks at patients diagnosed with pulmonary embolism (PE) and their experience and symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and existential anxiety following their diagnosis. They may also experience negative changes in perspective and hypervigilance of PE symptoms.

Many thanks to the RPTH (Research and Practice in Thrombosis and Haemostasis™) for the work that has been undertaken.

“The psychological impact of pulmonary embolism: A mixed‐methods study”

(Anna Tran BSc, Marcus Redley PhD and Kerstin de Wit MBChB, MD, MSc)

@kerstindewit

@thatannatran

@RPTHjournal

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *